How to prepare funds flow statement?

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MohitJindal  

  • Member Since May-2009 | May 1st, 2009


A fund flow statement or a cash flow statement records the changes in monetary funds over a period of time, usually by comparing the latest position at balance sheet date with the corresponding monetary position a year ago.

There are various elements of business that affect fund/cash flow. These include such things as increased sales, reductions or increases in debtors, longer or shorter times in paying creditors, repayments of loans, etc., a summary of which should be shown on separate lines of the statement. It can start with a section listing the elements that contribute to an increase in cash, then the next section lists those items which have contributed to a decrease in cash.

Space (and time!) does not permit more comprehensive details of what is needed and how to do it. You should consult a text book on Financial Accounting and look at the fund/cash flow statement of a company similar to the one for which you wish to prepare such a statement.

At the end of the fund/cash flow statement, if you have done all your calculations correctly, and taken everything that affects cash movement into account, your final figure will equal the cash figure in the balance sheet.

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A fund flow statement or a cash flow statement records the changes in monetary funds over a period of time, usually by comparing the latest position at balance sheet date with the corresponding monetary position a year ago.

There are various elements of business that affect fund/cash flow. These include such things as increased sales, reductions or increases in debtors, longer or shorter times in paying creditors, repayments of loans, etc., a summary of which should be shown on separate lines of the statement. It can start with a section listing the elements that contribute to an increase in cash, then the next section lists those items which have contributed to a decrease in cash.

Space (and time!) does not permit more comprehensive details of what is needed and how to do it. You should consult a text book on Financial Accounting and look at the fund/cash flow statement of a company similar to the one for which you wish to prepare such a statement.

At the end of the fund/cash flow statement, if you have done all your calculations correctly, and taken everything that affects cash movement into account, your final figure will equal the cash figure in the balance sheet.

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